Review Roundup: Dogman, The Lonely Battle of Thomas Reid, Touch Me Not, Orphée

Four films are released at the IFI on Friday October 19th: Dogman, The Lonely Battle of Thomas Reid, Touch Me Not and Orphée. Read on for a selection of reviews or pop in to make up your own mind!

DOGMAN
“The surrounding ghost town, the ghostly coast and Nicolaj Bruel’s rusted cinematography lend an even greater poignancy to Garrone’s very Shakespearean tragedy”
4/5 – Irish Times

“A movie with incomparable bite and strength”
5/5 – Guardian

“The overall feel is of the kind of Aesop’s fable Scorsese would tell his kids”
4/5 – Time Out

“A teeth-chattering culmination of Matteo Garrone’s darkest themes”
Hollywood Reporter

“The lead performance, from the mostly unknown Fonte, is a small symphony of crumbling ingratiation: the portrait of a good man trying to cling to his principles in the face of stubborn, selfish immorality”
AV Club

THE LONELY BATTLE OF THOMAS REID
“Feargal Ward has crafted one of the most unique and, perhaps, indefinable pieces of cinema this year”
4/5 – Independent.ie

“Few people watching The Lonely Battle of Thomas Reid will resist the odd smile at our protagonist’s singular habits”
4/5 – Irish Times

“a fascinating portrait of a determined son of the land”
4/5 – RTE

“Feargal Ward’s handsome documentary explores the clash between tradition and progress; between the rights of the individual and the perceived good of society”
Screen Daily

TOUCH ME NOT
“Touch Me Not should strike a chord most readily with those who’ve struggled to understand or express their own identity, but adventurous viewers of all persuasions should approach this celebration of female and minority sexuality with an open mind”
Sight and Sound

“The film is (incoming critical cliché alert) “not for everyone”, but it’s encouraging to see something so brave registering in the upper echelons”
3/5 – Irish Times

“A relentlessly immersive tour de force”
Hollywood Reporter

“A studious, intelligent, if flawed and scattershot, work with an open mind about modern sexuality and intimacy”
The Film Stage

ORPHÉE
“It has the mystery and elasticity of a dream”
5/5 – Guardian

“Seeing Orpheus today is like glimpsing a cinematic realm that has passed completely from the scene”
4/4 – Roger Ebert

“Its tight cross-lacing of paranoid dreaming and poetic realism grips like a bondage corset”
Time Out

“Jean Cocteau’s scripting and directing give the film its proper key of unworldliness”
Variety

“A magical enduring classic, to be seen again and again”
Observer


The IFI is supported
by The Arts Council

Arts Council of Ireland