FROM THE VAULTS: MARE NOSTRUM WITH LIVE ACCOMPANIMENT BY 3EPKANO

Rex Ingram

Book Tickets

This silent film will be accompanied by a specially created score by 3epkano which will be performed live. The screening will be introduced by Ruth Barton, author of Rex Ingram: Visionary Director of the Silent Screen.

Mare Nostrum was Irish director Rex Ingram’s second World War One release after The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse of 1921. It was also his and his wife and star, Alice Terry’s, favourite film. For Terry this was because she was finally able to play a femme fatale, the Austrian spy, Freya Thalberg. For Ingram, it was the first film he made at the Victorine Studios in Nice, far from the constraints of Hollywood and his nemesis, Louis B. Mayer.

Mare Nostrum contains many Ingram trademarks, particularly his eye for scenery, his love of grotesque characters and his exploration of supernatural themes. The film is rarely seen nowadays and this beautifully restored print is a reminder of what an extraordinarily talented filmmaker Ingram was.

About 3epkano
3epkano are a Dublin based collective who are dedicated to producing original soundtracks for silent and avant-garde cinema. Founded in early 2004 by Matthew Nolan, they have played numerous headline shows in both Ireland and the US to great critical acclaim. The group have also been commissioned to produce new music for such prestigious institutions as The National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin Fringe Festival, Film Society of Lincoln Centre and the Brooklyn Academy of Music in New York. They also performed at The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC to launch their winter 2011 film programme. The group’s most recent project involves collaboration with the acclaimed Irish singer Iarla Ó’Lionáird on a score for the German classic, Der Golem. They will release their score for this movie in early 2015. Their score for Mare Nostrum has been created specially for the IFI screening and has been funded by the Trinity College Dublin Visual and Performing Arts Fund.

 

102 minutes, 1926, Silent, Black and White

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